words and art by w a l t e r w s m i t h

Posts tagged “Film

New Landscapes: Winter – The Film Of Life

New Landscapes: Winter - The Film Of Life

An empty theater
A foreboding glacier chill
The bitter reminder
Of a life story un-fulfilled

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Images For HD Video: Sometimes In The Waking The Reality Is More Pressing Than The Dream

There are times when I have a visual dream. In the waking. A collage of kinetic images. And as painful as it may sometimes be, I can but only love … living my art; finding fuel for it in the most unlikely places …

a new day …

This piece is an exploration of the moment when waking from a dream. The dream persists, but so does the realities of life:  Our personal journey. As they intrude. Crash. Collide. And take us for a ride along the highway of uncertainty. I think it is here, in this moment, that we can rise from our slumber with our greatest fear or with our greatest hope. As we face the day, with our portfolio of experiences, memories, and designs, we can, with internal intent and wisdom, begin our search for a better tomorrow.

http://youtu.be/58Nwb7HmbLQ  –  Sometimes In the Waking the Reality Is More Pressing Than the Dream 3:10; music by Nine Inch Nails


Images For HD Video: An Unfolding Night Next To You (A Scattered Storm Remix)

The night holds many mysteries when time stands still….

she remains transfixed
trapped in summer's night
contemplating the approaching storm

Searching for chance in the process of creating art.

Within the context of my digital and video work, the objective is to find visual ambient experiences. The process at times, is a stationary camera. Post-production: Unedited film, or with very minimal post editing and digital effects. With this piece, I altered the color tonality. The difficulty in the piece was balancing the black sky, now slightly colorized, while maintaining a brightness/contrast without compromising the visibility of the lightning strikes.

Art can be discovered by random chance.

An Unfolding Night Next To You is the first in a series of new HD experimental video work-in-progress. Some years ago, my first exploration of the still camera and chance recording was an hour-long piece entitled Oceans of Art. This 2012 video was filmed during a late night drive on HWY 221 in South Carolina through a scattered rain storm. Darkness, lightning strikes, pressing rain, and the headlights of passing cars all merge with the music of sound design artist, and master of glitch Alva Noto, creating an eerie journey into meditative abstraction. Rain drops falling on the window shield create a mosaic of pixel forms. These forms are constantly moving and manipulating the video. While sporadic lightning strikes fill the night sky. Patience is in order to gather the full ambient feeling of the piece. Things are there.

Recommended viewing: In a very dark room by single candle light.

http://youtu.be/-KKafg4qoaQ   –  Copyright 2012 – Walter Smith


Images For HD Video: A Day At The Beach (A Tybee Island Remix)

A Tybee Beach remix…

Tybee Island is a small public beach located on the Atlantic Ocean near the Georgia/South Carolina border. It is just a few minutes away from historic Savannah GA.

A day on the beach, with sand and surf in hand.

http://youtu.be/Qsp8xhCNHMw


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Images For Android Phones: The Dark Outside My Window

Images For Android Phones: The Dark Outside My Window

the film ends
no longer a starring role
outside my window
the darkness
is collecting its toll

are you there
feeling it’s unfair
– our lost
you have to bare

sitting there
– with empty seats
and
ending dreams

no starring role

here
just the things
we sometimes fear…


Weekly Movie-Making Moments In Film: Berlin Alexanderplatz by Rainer Werner Fassbinder

A scene from Berlin Alexanderplatz

It is 2012, and thanks to the Criterion Collection and NetFlix I am able this weekend to once again view the epic masterpiece Berlin Alexanderplatz by Director Rainer Werner Fassbinder. In the 1980’s Philadelphia’s PBS station WHYY aired the entire 16 hour film. I was totally amazed at the dark story of a man and his descent into a personal hell; as well as its historical portrayal of Germany in the pre-Nazi era. This is a disturbing film, yet beautiful and engrossing. It’s cinematography and storytelling captures the imagination with vivid realism.

Here is a short synopsis.

Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s controversial, fifteen-hour-plus Berlin Alexanderplatz, based on Alfred Döblin’s great modernist novel, was the crowning achievement of a prolific director who, at age thirty-four, had already made forty films. Fassbinder’s immersive epic, restored in 2006 and now available on DVD in this country for the first time, follows the hulking, childlike ex-convict Franz Biberkopf (Günter Lamprecht) as he attempts to “become an honest soul” amid the corrosive urban landscape of Weimar-era Germany. With equal parts cynicism and humanity, Fassbinder details a mammoth portrait of a common man struggling to survive in a viciously uncommon time.

The English trailer for the film Berlin Alexanderplatz

http://youtu.be/qTjFWAvJTvI

A short tribute to a modern Berlin Alexanderplatz

http://youtu.be/wC2equOfOvc


Gotye: Eyes Wide Open

Well I am enjoying my day discovering this really cool artist. So I thought I would pass on the delight. Visually intriguing and lyrically profound.

Thanks Daniel for the introduction

Eyes Wide Open.

http://youtu.be/oyVJsg0XIIk


Weekly Movie-Making Moments In Film – The Woman in the Dunes by Hiroshi Teshigahara and based on the novel by Kobe Abe

I have recently seen the wonderful Japanese film Suna no onna (Woman in the Dunes) 1964 by Director Hiroshi Teshigahara. It is an extraordinary film. Beautifully crafted. Surreal and mesmerizing. I highly recommend it. Below is a link to an analytical review and a link which contains the featured film. The film is available on Net Flix as well. The film is 2-hours and 27 minutes long. I have included a short synopsis of the film below.

http://youtu.be/P-2xec9Ebg0  – video essay by James Quandt – part 1 (please note, I was unable to find part 2 of the essay). Part 1 ends abruptly.

http://youtu.be/H-5fY8hZdTs – Feature Film

An entomologist, Jumpei Niki (played in the film by Eiji Okada), is on an expedition to collect insects which inhabit sand dunes. When he misses the last bus, villagers suggest he stay the night. They guide him down a rope ladder to a house in a sand quarry where a young widow (Kyoko Kishida) lives alone. She is employed by the villagers to dig sand for sale and to save the house from burial in the advancing sand.

When Jumpei tries to leave the next morning, he finds the ladder removed. The villagers inform him that he must help the widow in her endless task of digging sand. Jumpei initially tries to escape; upon failing he takes the widow captive but is forced to release her in order to receive water from the villagers.

Jumpei becomes the widow’s lover. However, he still desperately wants to leave. One morning, he escapes from the sand dune and starts running while being chased by the villagers. Jumpei is not familiar with the geography of the area and eventually gets trapped in some quicksand. The villagers free him from the quicksand and then return him back to the widow.

Eventually, Jumpei resigns himself to his fate. Through his persistent effort to trap a crow as a messenger, he discovers a way to draw water from the damp sand at night. He thus becomes absorbed in the task of perfecting his technology and adapts to his “trapped” life. The focus of the film shifts to the way in which the couple cope with the oppressiveness of their condition and the power of their physical attraction in spite of — or possibly because of — their situation.

At the end of the film Jumpei gets his chance to escape, but he chooses to prolong his stay in the dune. A report after seven years declaring him missing is then shown hanging from a wall, written by the police and signed by his mother Shino.


Asheville And Art For Cities (A Post Canvas And Paint Video Remix)

Asheville the Paris of the South….

I have had the pleasure and opportunity to travel to some rather unique cities such Paris France, Amsterdam in the Netherlands, and here in America, cities like Washington DC, NYC, and Los Angeles. In these major cities there are never a shortage of great art, fine dining, and exciting culture. The streets are always alive throughout the day and into the night.

But I have also come to love the small to medium-sized cities such as Greenville SC, Burlington VT, and my favorite Asheville, NC. Asheville is very beautiful. Bohemian and unique. It is a gay-friendly city and a haven for those who seek a more spiritual lifestyle. It is nestled in a valley surrounded by the Blue Ridge Mountains. It host for the visitor or long-time resident, diverse experiences to discover the world of  art, theatre, music, and outdoor adventure. I simply fell in love with the city many years ago.

Here is my tribute to a great city….

http://youtu.be/8YxbdmYVXJI


Weekly Movie-Making Moments in Film: Chelsea Walls

I thought I would start showing clips from some of my favorite films. Over the years, I have spent a considerable amount of time in theaters, and long nights viewing video tapes, and DVDs. And we cannot forget the ever consuming Netflicks via our computers. It is time to go deep, yes—very deep—and find those rare moments in classic film-making. These beautiful, intrepid, and visceral moments can be found delving into the issues of obsessive love, angst, betrayal, and tragedy (thinking of French, German and Asian films in particular). And what comes to mind when thinking of tragic French films? Well we can find the French catapulting our emotions in such films as: Un Couer En Hiver (A Heart in Winter) directed by Claudet Sautet, Damage with French actress Juliette Binoche and film direction by Louis Malle. And last but not least—my favorite French excursion into obsession is none other than the film Camille Claudel finely directed by Bruno Nuyten and starring Isabelle Adjani as Camille—the young but gifted sculptress full of artistic and romantic passion. Her love for the sculptor, Auguste Rodin—as you can imagine—will only end in pain and lost.

I hope over time to share from around the world some masterful works in cinema. However, to kick off this Weekly Movie-Making Moments in Film, I present what I think defines a good film moment i.e. strong characterization, heart-felt expression by the performer, and feeling as if you can truly relate to the scene or film in general. For this first challenge, I am selecting the “poem” scene in the film Chelsea Walls as recited by Rosario Dawson.

Tell me what you think of this moment in the film, and what you think of this concept in general. Do you have a favorite moment or film that has influence you in some way? Please share.

http://youtu.be/NUqRK8bwhwI